Criminal Behavior Theories Typologies And Criminal Justice Pdf


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criminal behavior theories typologies and criminal justice pdf

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Sorting people into types according to distinguishing traits or forms of behavior that are presumed to characterize them is a common social process. For example, high school students often label their classmates as "hoods," "jocks," "Goths," or "brains.

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Criminology: Books & E-Books

The largest number of criminological theories have been developed through sociological inquiry. These theories have generally asserted that criminal behaviour is a normal response of biologically and psychologically normal individuals to particular kinds of social circumstances.

The more an individual associates with such persons, the more likely it becomes that he will learn and adopt criminal values and behaviours. The theory of anomie , proposed by the American sociologist Robert K. The concept of a criminal subculture —an alternative set of moral values and expectations to which people can turn if they cannot find acceptable routes to the objectives held out for them by the broader society—represents an integration of the differential-association and anomie theories.

Developed from studies of gangs of delinquents in U. Another set of sociological theories also denies the existence of subcultural value systems. Control theory emphasizes the links between the offender and his social group—his bond to society. According to this view, the ability of the individual to resist the inclination to commit crime depends on the strength of his attachment to his parents, his involvement in conventional activities and avenues of progress, and his commitment to orthodox moral values that prohibit the conduct in question.

The theory of low self-control retains the focus on restraints from engaging in crime but argues that those restraints are primarily internal. People with low self-control, according to this theory, are impulsive and insensitive to others, tend to engage in physical rather than mental activities and to take risks, and are oriented toward the short term rather than the long term. Advocates of self-control theory argue that these characteristics result from parental child-rearing practices and coalesce in the individual by about age eight, remaining stable throughout life.

It contends that the individual, once convicted of a crime, is labeled a criminal and thereby acquires a criminal identity. Once returned to society, he continues to be regarded as a criminal and is consequently rejected by law-abiding persons and accepted by other delinquents. Over time, therefore, the offender becomes increasingly socialized into criminal behaviour patterns and more estranged from law-abiding behaviour.

In particular, these theories generally explain both crime and criminal justice as by-products of capitalism and explore alternative systems that might generate more harmonious social relations. Radical theories tend to view criminal law as an instrument by which the powerful and affluent coerce the poor into patterns of behaviour that preserve the status quo. Advocates of this theory argue that criminal justice policies constitute state-sanctioned violence that generates rather than suppresses criminal violence.

A similar view is represented by conflict theories , which hold that the powerful pursue their own self-interest though the enactment and enforcement of criminal laws. According to conflict theory, those with power and wealth are more likely to obey the criminal law because it tends to serve their interests. In addition, they are better able than poor people to avoid being incriminated when they do violate the law.

Social-structural-strain theories attempt to explain the high rate of theft for monetary gain in the United States as a product of the class structure of American society. They hold that pressures to achieve financial success drive people to engage in this type of crime. They also maintain that less-affluent people commit these types of crime more frequently than wealthy people do, because members of lower economic classes generally have fewer opportunities to make money through legitimate means.

Finally, ecological theories focus on the influence of neighbourhood organization on criminal activity. Researchers have found that poorer neighbourhoods, where families frequently move from one location to another and where there is a relatively high proportion of single-parent households, tend to have higher crime rates. Ecological theorists argue that this is a result of the inability of neighbourhood residents, because of the chaotic conditions of their lives, to organize effectively to achieve their goals.

Since China has generally advocated a Marxist interpretation of the causes of crime, viewing it as a product of an exploitative class structure founded upon the institution of private property. A number of specific sources of criminal activity have been suggested: 1 external enemies and remnants of the overthrown reactionary classes the latter referring to the government of the Republic of China in Taiwan , 2 other remnants of the old pre society, including gangsters and hooligans, who refuse to reform, 3 lingering aspects of bourgeois ideology that value profit, cunning, selfishness, and decadence and thus encourage crime, and 4 the poverty and cultural backwardness that is seen as the legacy of the old society.

The economic reforms launched in China beginning in the mids led to dramatic economic growth but also to a significant increase in criminal activity. Although some dismissed the increase as a residual effect of the Cultural Revolution, the phenomenon is more often explained as arising from various unintended consequences of the economic reforms, including a loss of respect for leaders of society and for the collective goals of the socialist state and the spread of selfishness and lack of regard for others.

Thus, because Chinese criminology views crime as mainly caused by backward thinking and ignorance, Chinese authorities have emphasized thought reform and education to combat criminal activity. Similar theories of the causes of crime are found in other societies that retain a Marxist economic system , including Cuba and North Korea. Criminology Article Media Additional Info. Article Contents.

Load Previous Page. Sociological theories The largest number of criminological theories have been developed through sociological inquiry. Read More on This Topic. Researchers in the field of criminology have endeavoured to obtain a more-accurate picture of the incidence of crimes and the trends and Load Next Page.

Typologies of Criminal Behavior

Skip to main content Skip to table of contents. Advertisement Hide. This service is more advanced with JavaScript available. Front Matter Pages i-xix. When Law and Psychology Meet. Pages

The largest number of criminological theories have been developed through sociological inquiry. These theories have generally asserted that criminal behaviour is a normal response of biologically and psychologically normal individuals to particular kinds of social circumstances. The more an individual associates with such persons, the more likely it becomes that he will learn and adopt criminal values and behaviours. The theory of anomie , proposed by the American sociologist Robert K. The concept of a criminal subculture —an alternative set of moral values and expectations to which people can turn if they cannot find acceptable routes to the objectives held out for them by the broader society—represents an integration of the differential-association and anomie theories. Developed from studies of gangs of delinquents in U.

Criminology Notes Pdf

Email: jhelfgot seattleu. She has served as principal investigator on applied research that spans policing, courts, corrections, and victim services. Helfgott, J. No Remorse: Psychopathy and Criminal Justice. Criminal Psychology, Volumes

Criminology Notes Pdf. Definition of Criminology 2. Students, teachers and scholars in criminology, law and sociology will find this Companion invaluable.

Archer, E. Pretoria: Research Rescue. ISBN:

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